The Bulls and the Last dance
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Steve007
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PostPosted: Sun May 10, 2020 7:29 pm    Post subject:

Jordan completely destroys Payton and creates a new meme. This was HILARIOUS and the best part out of the 8 episodes I’ve seen.

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PostPosted: Mon May 11, 2020 3:30 pm    Post subject:

adkindo wrote:
"Nice game Mike".....is all it took to set MJ off.


MJ made it up to fuel himself.
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PostPosted: Mon May 11, 2020 3:30 pm    Post subject:

adkindo wrote:
"Nice game Mike".....is all it took to set MJ off.


MJ made it up to fuel himself.
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PostPosted: Mon May 11, 2020 4:50 pm    Post subject:

adkindo wrote:
Totally forgot Chris Mullin was on that 1997-98 Pacers team.


Mullin was on the Pacers for the last part of his career. He was on the team in 2000 that went to the Finals.
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PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2020 1:17 pm    Post subject:

MJ knows it to be true. He can't hide the truth!
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PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2020 1:30 pm    Post subject:

Basketball Fan wrote:
https://www.msn.com/en-us/sports/nba/mccurdy-heres-a-little-known-michael-jordan-story-you-wont-see-on-espns-documentary/ar-BB13vfeB?li=BBnb7Kz

Quote:
McCurdy: Here's a little-known Michael Jordan story you won't see on ESPN's documentary

There's a part of Michael Jordan's story that likely won't make the cut in ESPN's 10-hour documentary "The Last Dance" that is holding America's attention captive each Sunday night this spring.

We know Jordan is arguably the greatest basketball player of all time from his six championship seasons with the Chicago Bulls. We know he's a hard-wired competitor who hates to lose — at anything. We know he's the ultimate corporate pitchman and an iconic symbol from his long association with Nike and its Jumpman logo. We know he's a business mogul and is the first NBA player to be the primary owner a franchise, leading the Charlotte Hornets. We know he's among the most famous people walking Earth.


But did you know Michael Jordan loved motorcycles and racing so much that he started a motorsports team that competed for a decade in America's top road racing series?

Unless, you're an AMA Pro Road Racing fan going back two decades or you're a regular at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course, probably not.

Yet it's a fascinating story.

Jordan grew up in NASCAR country in North Carolina, so like many from the South, he enjoyed watching racing and learned to appreciate it. Also as a kid, the Jordans had a little dirt bike for Michael and his brothers, and he loved the speed and freedom he felt from racing it around.

But when he became a professional athlete, his contracts forbade him from riding.

In the 1990s and early 2000s, there was an underground motorcycle culture in Chicago. Riders would get together in packs late at night and race around the city's avenues and freeways until the wee hours of the morning while traffic was light.

One night one of those groups passed a guy riding a Ducati on the highway before they all exited for a gas station. When the Ducati followed them in and he took off his helmet, they knew it wasn't an ordinary rider.

"It's an unbelievable story," Casmay said in 2004. "A guy from ESPN Magazine came to do a story, and the first thing he said was, 'You don't meet Michael Jordan at a gas station, so how do you meet him?' I said, 'Well, actually that's the way we met.' He couldn't believe it."

Actually Casmay couldn't believe it either.

"You want to meet him, but what do you say that's worth saying to him?" he said.

One of the riders in the pack met Jordan years earlier when his uncle worked security for Bulls teammate Dennis Rodman. So he went over to Jordan and told him to ditch the Nike sweatsuit, sneakers and weight lifting gloves and start wearing real riding attire like leathers, boots and riding gloves to be safer. He also gave Jordan his card and told him to call if he ever wanted to go riding with the group.

Two days later, the riders had a new member.

"It became almost a nightly thing," Casmay said.

Jordan was new at riding and told Casmay that he wanted to learn from the best. Casmay turned to his friend Montez Stewart, a street riding legend in Chicago who had just started a budding road racing career on the club circuits.

"I rode on the streets with him for a little while, and he was impressed with the way I rode. I told him we needed to go to a race track and then you could see what we really do," Stewart said.

In September of 2003, just months after his final basketball retirement with the Washington Wizards, Jordan rented Blackhawk Farms Raceway in Illinois.

"I told him, 'I know people approach you with all sorts of craziness all the time, but what I know is you're stepping into my arena. This is what I do. I can teach you and show you what to do, but you've got to listen and take it serious because it's so easy to go out and hurt yourself,'" Stewart said.

He found a willing pupil in Jordan.

"I'm sure there are a lot of things he couldn't do because of basketball contracts. He's always loved motorcycles, and he's always wanted to ride. He was retired, so why not enjoy the fruits of his labor?" Stewart said.



Video by TODAY
He showed Jordan how to take a knee while cornering and even saw Jordan spring up after laying down the bike.

"The bug bit him and he was ready to go after that," Stewart said.

Not long after that adventure, Stewart got a call from Jordan asking for a meeting where they discussed Stewart's racing career and the constant search for money to do it competitively.

Afterward, Stewart called Casmay and asked for his help in drafting a proposal for Jordan's people since Casmay had a business background as a manager for Nestle Chocolate and as an owner of his own investment company. Within a month, they were in business.

Michael Jordan Motorsports was born.

Stewart moved up to the highest ranks of professional motorcycle road racing in America; Casmay was living his dream by heading up the new racing enterprise; and Jordan's brand and his associated sponsors had a chance to reach a new market and demographics.

However, finding success on the track proved elusive.

Normally it takes a year to start a team from scratch. Jordan did it in less than two months. Stewart was a 31-year-old rookie going against legacies and kids who literally started riding as soon as they could walk. And being a novice in a paddock filled with factory-backed outfits, well-funded satellite teams and seasoned privateers didn't help the cause.

At the Honda Super Cycle Weekend hosted by Mid-Ohio in July of 2004, Stewart went one lap in the Superstock race before a mechanical problem ended his ride. That was more than he got out of the Supersport race where he crashed out in the first turn.

"I think there's pressure on any guy with any sponsor because they want their stuff to shine," Stewart said before that long ago race weekend. "The one thing (Jordan) told me is, 'Tez, you're the underdog so go out there and shock some people and do what you can do.'"

At the 2004 season opener in Daytona, Jordan showed off his new enterprise to his agent David Falk, old Bulls teammate Charles Oakley and officials with Nike and Gatorade who were on board with the venture.

"He said he wished he'd gotten into this a long time ago. When we rode back on the plane, he said that was one of the best experiences he's ever had," Stewart said.

By the next year, Jordan's competitive nature got to him and he became serious about the venture.

"Last year, Michael had no idea what he was getting into. He was just helping a buddy out and having some fun," veteran rider Josh Hayes said. "He went to a lot of races, listened to everybody, picked their brains for information and realized this is a great sport."

Jordan dumped the underperforming Yamahas for Suzuki, the dominant manufacturer during that time. He also brought in seasoned road racing pros Jason Pridmore and Steve Rapp to add to Stewart.

Over the next several seasons, former champions like Aaron Yates, Ben Bostrom and Jake Zemke plus younger stars like Roger Lee Hayden and Danny Eslick would also ride in the Jumpman leathers, enjoying podium finishes and race wins. Yates brought a Superstock championship to the team in 2008; Corey Alexander earned a SuperSport East title in 2013; and Zemke gave MJM its first Superbike win in 2010 — the highest level of the series.

If not for the unsettled nature of American road racing in the mid-2010s, Jordan might still be competing. Instead, with crowds waning and TV broadcasts fleeting, he shuttered the team in 2014.

It may not match what he did on the basketball court, but nevertheless, Jordan left a lasting legacy in motorcycle racing.

And to think it all came to be because of a chance encounter at a Chicago gas station. It's a fascinating story worthy of an 11th hour.


I actually watched that series when MJ had his motorcycle team. His team was one of the better funded teams of the series and hired the top riders. Unfortunately, motorcycle road racing isn't that big in this country and the series he raced at not a lot of people showed up to watch like a NASCAR race. So it was probably inevitable that the team left the series since he was doing it out of charity and hobby instead of a money making venture.
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RobinInHood
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PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2020 9:52 am    Post subject:

Man...Karl Malone walking into the Bulls bus after they lost the 98 finals, that’s some sportsmanship right there. What great documentary!
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PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2020 10:26 am    Post subject:

This documentary feels like pro-Jordan propaganda rather than a balanced view.
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PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2020 3:25 pm    Post subject:

CandyCanes wrote:
This documentary feels like pro-Jordan propaganda rather than a balanced view.


Because it was and a large part of why I didn't watch it.

That and I lived through it no need to watch it again.
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PostPosted: Mon May 18, 2020 6:33 pm    Post subject:

Well it’s hard not to be pro-Jordan when you review what happened and the guy won 6. And the biggest reason he didn’t win 7 is the owner didn’t want to spend and give it another try.
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PostPosted: Tue May 19, 2020 3:29 pm    Post subject:

lakersken80 wrote:
Basketball Fan wrote:
https://www.msn.com/en-us/sports/nba/mccurdy-heres-a-little-known-michael-jordan-story-you-wont-see-on-espns-documentary/ar-BB13vfeB?li=BBnb7Kz

Quote:
McCurdy: Here's a little-known Michael Jordan story you won't see on ESPN's documentary

There's a part of Michael Jordan's story that likely won't make the cut in ESPN's 10-hour documentary "The Last Dance" that is holding America's attention captive each Sunday night this spring.

We know Jordan is arguably the greatest basketball player of all time from his six championship seasons with the Chicago Bulls. We know he's a hard-wired competitor who hates to lose — at anything. We know he's the ultimate corporate pitchman and an iconic symbol from his long association with Nike and its Jumpman logo. We know he's a business mogul and is the first NBA player to be the primary owner a franchise, leading the Charlotte Hornets. We know he's among the most famous people walking Earth.


But did you know Michael Jordan loved motorcycles and racing so much that he started a motorsports team that competed for a decade in America's top road racing series?

Unless, you're an AMA Pro Road Racing fan going back two decades or you're a regular at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course, probably not.

Yet it's a fascinating story.

Jordan grew up in NASCAR country in North Carolina, so like many from the South, he enjoyed watching racing and learned to appreciate it. Also as a kid, the Jordans had a little dirt bike for Michael and his brothers, and he loved the speed and freedom he felt from racing it around.

But when he became a professional athlete, his contracts forbade him from riding.

In the 1990s and early 2000s, there was an underground motorcycle culture in Chicago. Riders would get together in packs late at night and race around the city's avenues and freeways until the wee hours of the morning while traffic was light.

One night one of those groups passed a guy riding a Ducati on the highway before they all exited for a gas station. When the Ducati followed them in and he took off his helmet, they knew it wasn't an ordinary rider.

"It's an unbelievable story," Casmay said in 2004. "A guy from ESPN Magazine came to do a story, and the first thing he said was, 'You don't meet Michael Jordan at a gas station, so how do you meet him?' I said, 'Well, actually that's the way we met.' He couldn't believe it."

Actually Casmay couldn't believe it either.

"You want to meet him, but what do you say that's worth saying to him?" he said.

One of the riders in the pack met Jordan years earlier when his uncle worked security for Bulls teammate Dennis Rodman. So he went over to Jordan and told him to ditch the Nike sweatsuit, sneakers and weight lifting gloves and start wearing real riding attire like leathers, boots and riding gloves to be safer. He also gave Jordan his card and told him to call if he ever wanted to go riding with the group.

Two days later, the riders had a new member.

"It became almost a nightly thing," Casmay said.

Jordan was new at riding and told Casmay that he wanted to learn from the best. Casmay turned to his friend Montez Stewart, a street riding legend in Chicago who had just started a budding road racing career on the club circuits.

"I rode on the streets with him for a little while, and he was impressed with the way I rode. I told him we needed to go to a race track and then you could see what we really do," Stewart said.

In September of 2003, just months after his final basketball retirement with the Washington Wizards, Jordan rented Blackhawk Farms Raceway in Illinois.

"I told him, 'I know people approach you with all sorts of craziness all the time, but what I know is you're stepping into my arena. This is what I do. I can teach you and show you what to do, but you've got to listen and take it serious because it's so easy to go out and hurt yourself,'" Stewart said.

He found a willing pupil in Jordan.

"I'm sure there are a lot of things he couldn't do because of basketball contracts. He's always loved motorcycles, and he's always wanted to ride. He was retired, so why not enjoy the fruits of his labor?" Stewart said.



Video by TODAY
He showed Jordan how to take a knee while cornering and even saw Jordan spring up after laying down the bike.

"The bug bit him and he was ready to go after that," Stewart said.

Not long after that adventure, Stewart got a call from Jordan asking for a meeting where they discussed Stewart's racing career and the constant search for money to do it competitively.

Afterward, Stewart called Casmay and asked for his help in drafting a proposal for Jordan's people since Casmay had a business background as a manager for Nestle Chocolate and as an owner of his own investment company. Within a month, they were in business.

Michael Jordan Motorsports was born.

Stewart moved up to the highest ranks of professional motorcycle road racing in America; Casmay was living his dream by heading up the new racing enterprise; and Jordan's brand and his associated sponsors had a chance to reach a new market and demographics.

However, finding success on the track proved elusive.

Normally it takes a year to start a team from scratch. Jordan did it in less than two months. Stewart was a 31-year-old rookie going against legacies and kids who literally started riding as soon as they could walk. And being a novice in a paddock filled with factory-backed outfits, well-funded satellite teams and seasoned privateers didn't help the cause.

At the Honda Super Cycle Weekend hosted by Mid-Ohio in July of 2004, Stewart went one lap in the Superstock race before a mechanical problem ended his ride. That was more than he got out of the Supersport race where he crashed out in the first turn.

"I think there's pressure on any guy with any sponsor because they want their stuff to shine," Stewart said before that long ago race weekend. "The one thing (Jordan) told me is, 'Tez, you're the underdog so go out there and shock some people and do what you can do.'"

At the 2004 season opener in Daytona, Jordan showed off his new enterprise to his agent David Falk, old Bulls teammate Charles Oakley and officials with Nike and Gatorade who were on board with the venture.

"He said he wished he'd gotten into this a long time ago. When we rode back on the plane, he said that was one of the best experiences he's ever had," Stewart said.

By the next year, Jordan's competitive nature got to him and he became serious about the venture.

"Last year, Michael had no idea what he was getting into. He was just helping a buddy out and having some fun," veteran rider Josh Hayes said. "He went to a lot of races, listened to everybody, picked their brains for information and realized this is a great sport."

Jordan dumped the underperforming Yamahas for Suzuki, the dominant manufacturer during that time. He also brought in seasoned road racing pros Jason Pridmore and Steve Rapp to add to Stewart.

Over the next several seasons, former champions like Aaron Yates, Ben Bostrom and Jake Zemke plus younger stars like Roger Lee Hayden and Danny Eslick would also ride in the Jumpman leathers, enjoying podium finishes and race wins. Yates brought a Superstock championship to the team in 2008; Corey Alexander earned a SuperSport East title in 2013; and Zemke gave MJM its first Superbike win in 2010 — the highest level of the series.

If not for the unsettled nature of American road racing in the mid-2010s, Jordan might still be competing. Instead, with crowds waning and TV broadcasts fleeting, he shuttered the team in 2014.

It may not match what he did on the basketball court, but nevertheless, Jordan left a lasting legacy in motorcycle racing.

And to think it all came to be because of a chance encounter at a Chicago gas station. It's a fascinating story worthy of an 11th hour.


I actually watched that series when MJ had his motorcycle team. His team was one of the better funded teams of the series and hired the top riders. Unfortunately, motorcycle road racing isn't that big in this country and the series he raced at not a lot of people showed up to watch like a NASCAR race. So it was probably inevitable that the team left the series since he was doing it out of charity and hobby instead of a money making venture.


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PostPosted: Wed May 20, 2020 11:46 am    Post subject:

I really enjoyed all the back scenes footage even though it was essentially a gushing tribute to Jordan.

A similar show done on the Showtime Lakers with that kind of never seen before footage would be awesome.
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PostPosted: Thu May 21, 2020 9:09 am    Post subject:

CandyCanes wrote:
This documentary feels like pro-Jordan propaganda rather than a balanced view.


Probably. But it goes to show you the Bulls were irrelevant before MJ and post MJ.
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PostPosted: Sun May 24, 2020 9:34 pm    Post subject:

Definitely pro Jordan, but I'm still enjoying it for many reasons unrelated to MJ. The 90s Bulls were like The Beatles, it's almost like watching a rock documentary about a band on tour. Dennis Rodman, Phil Jackson, Jerry Krause and Steve Kerr all have immensely interesting, sometimes tragic stories, which I wasn't aware of. Rodman in particular, I knew has was insane, but boy what a character! Billy Corgan of Smashing Pumpkins, who's a Chicago native and sports fan who befriended Rodman in the 90s, was on a podcast telling these insane Rodman stories a while back and I assumed they were BS. Now I know he wasn't kidding! Of course you get multiple hrs. of MJ being a massive c--t but the environment which bred the MJ phenomenon was fascinating and the doc does a great job in illustrating this. It's a neat time capsule back into the 1990s.
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PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2020 8:54 pm    Post subject:

https://nba.nbcsports.com/2020/05/25/michael-jordan-on-tape-saying-he-wouldnt-play-on-dream-team-with-isiah-thomas/

Quote:
Michael Jordan on tape saying he wouldn’t play on Dream Team with Isiah Thomas

In “The Last Dance,” Michael Jordan was asked to react to Isiah Thomas’ explanation of the Pistons’ infamous walk-off. Jordan replied immediately:

I know it’s all bulls—. Whatever he says now, you know it wasn’t his true actions then. He’s had time enough to think about it. Or the reaction of the public, that’s kind of changed his perspective of it. You can show me anything you want. There’s no way you can convince me he wasn’t an a—hole.

Maybe there was some projection in that answer.

For years, Jordan has denied any involvement in Thomas not making the Dream Team. Rod Thorn, who was on the selection committee for the 1992 Olympics, has backed Jordan’s version of events.

But Jordan once revealed a different story.

Jordan on Jack McCallum’s “The Dream Team Tapes:”

Rod Thorn called me. I said, “Rod, I won’t play if Isiah Thomas is on the team.” He assured me. He said, “You know what? Chuck doesn’t want Isiah. So, Isiah is not going to be part of the team.”

Yes, the Pistons were being poor sports when they left the floor without shaking the Bulls’ hands in the 1991 playoffs. But that neither began nor ended the story.

The Bulls repeatedly disrespected the Pistons while finally overcoming Detroit. That particularly bothered the Pistons, because, on their way up, they paid deference to to the Celtics and Lakers. So, while the walk-off was – even according to Thomas – regrettable, it happened for a reason.

Jordan carrying his vendetta to the Dream Team only escalated matters. Yet, unlike the Pistons for not shaking hands, Jordan receives minimal scorn for his poor sportsmanship. Threatening not to play if a rival player is also included is the antithesis of what people want the Olympics to stand for.

And Jordan is now on published audio admitting that’s exactly what he did. You can listen to him for yourself.

As the best player and marketing giant, Jordan had the power. Thomas felt the consequences.

In 1992, Thomas was a marginal choice for the Dream Team. He wasn’t clearly better than the players who made it on current ability. He wasn’t as great as the players – Magic Johnson and Larry Bird – who made it on career accomplishments. It would’ve been fine to select Thomas. It would have been fine to omit him.

But it’s a shame he never got proper consideration on merit.

It’s also a shame Dream Team coach Chuck Daly, who coached Thomas in Detroit, is no longer alive to give his account. Did Dally really tell Thorn not to put Thomas on the Olympic team? Did Thorn really tell that to Jordan? Jordan and Thorn are just so untrustworthy on this matter.
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PostPosted: Thu May 28, 2020 8:31 pm    Post subject:

https://nba.nbcsports.com/2020/05/28/sam-smith-calls-michael-jordans-poison-pizza-story-complete-nonsense/


Quote:
Sam Smith calls Michael Jordan’s poison-pizza story ‘complete nonsense’


Michael Jordan claimed he ate an entire pizza himself the night before Game 5 of the 1997 NBA Finals and got food poisoning. Jordan’s trainer, Tim Grover, and personal assistant, George Koehler, corroborated, saying the pizza was suspiciously delivered by five guys.

A Utah man who claims to have made and delivered the pizza insisted the pizza wasn’t tainted.

Rumors of Jordan being hungover persist.

What really made Jordan sick during the “flu game”?

Sam Smith, who literally wrote the book on Jordan and covered the Bulls for the Chicago Tribune, called the poisoned-pizza story “complete nonsense” while appearing on 95.7 The Game.

Smith expanded on The Dan Patrick Show:

It wasn’t food poisoning. He made that up.

He wasn’t poisoned. That’s not what happened.

Michael Jordan, the most protected, nobody knows where he is, secure person – all of a sudden, five guys from the pizza place show?

He was ill. There’s no question. I think – I think – he had something that wasn’t as manly as maybe some other episodes.

I think because what they were doing was going up to Park City, in the mountains, in the ski area to stay. That’s where they stayed. So, they had to practice in Salt Lake City. They kept coming in and out, in and out. And I think it was altitude sickness. The symptoms that he had fit that much more than anything else that he had.

There was some sort of illness. There’s no question he was ill. I wouldn’t deny that. He definitely was. He was sick. But he wasn’t poisoned.

Smith is a journalist, not a doctor. I don’t trust his medical diagnosis. But he was positioned to gather and vet information. Phrases like “He made that up” and “That’s not what happened” are unequivocal. Even if he is just guessing on altitude sickness, Smith might have good reason to rule out food poisoning. He certainly talks like he does.

There might be something to Park City’s climate, though. Craig Fite, who said he delivered the pizza (with one other person, without knowing it was definitely going to the Bulls, let alone Jordan), recalled the windows being open in the hotel room as Jordan smoked a cigar. Fite found that notable because, when the sun goes behind the mountains, Park City can get chilly. The combination of cigar smoke, cold weather and altitude could have made Jordan sick.

But that still leaves questions.

Why make up the poison-pizza story? Grover told it in 2013, and Jordan confirmed it in “The Last Dance” (a documentary over which he held control). But before that, everyone remembers Jordan as having the flu.

Is food poisoning more manly than the flu? Was the flu more manly than altitude sickness? It’s tough to track these ideas of masculinity.

It’d be remarkable if the food-poisoning story were made up. Grover and Koehler provided so many supporting details. If this were a lie, it’s an elaborate one.

But we can’t put it past Jordan to lie – even when he’s on tape admitting otherwise.
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PostPosted: Thu May 28, 2020 11:33 pm    Post subject:

lakersken80 wrote:
CandyCanes wrote:
This documentary feels like pro-Jordan propaganda rather than a balanced view.


Probably. But it goes to show you the Bulls were irrelevant before MJ and post MJ.


They had a brief period where they were the #1 seed with Rose.
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