is Bob Dylan legit
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DaMuleRules
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2018 10:17 pm    Post subject:

VicXLakers wrote:
DaMuleRules wrote:
LarryCoon wrote:
Nice quote from RS's "100 Greatest Singers" article: "Bob Dylan did what very, very few singers ever do. He changed popular singing. And we have been living in a world shaped by Dylan's singing ever since. Almost no one sings like Elvis Presley anymore. Hundreds try to sing like Dylan. When Sam Cooke played Dylan for the young Bobby Womack, Womack said he didn't understand it. Cooke explained that from now on, it's not going to be about how pretty the voice is. It's going to be about believing that the voice is telling the truth."


Brilliant quote. And it reminds me a great deal of John Prine's songs. He'd be the first to say his voice was never pretty. Neither in his younger days, nor after his throat cancer turned it gravely (though he will say that the deeper tone he has as a result is more in what his range should have been). His voice isn't pretty, but when you hear him sing his songs, it resonates because even when you know he's just spinning a tale, it's absolutely the "truth".


John Prine was a mailman in Westchester IL just south of where I grew up so he was a local legend at my high school...he went to Proviso East about 10 years before I went to Proviso West so we got a steady diet of his music in class


Indeed he was. He says he came up with a lot of his early material while walking his route. I used to pump gas at a 76 station where he was a regular back in the early ‘80s and he was living in L.A. I liked his Porsche so we’d make small talk while I’d pump his gas. That’s how I came to know his music. My wife is a huge fan of his from her days days growing up outside of Chicago and listening to Prine and Steve Goodman. We make sure to see John perform every chance we can get.
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2018 10:50 pm    Post subject:

DaMuleRules wrote:
VicXLakers wrote:
DaMuleRules wrote:
LarryCoon wrote:
Nice quote from RS's "100 Greatest Singers" article: "Bob Dylan did what very, very few singers ever do. He changed popular singing. And we have been living in a world shaped by Dylan's singing ever since. Almost no one sings like Elvis Presley anymore. Hundreds try to sing like Dylan. When Sam Cooke played Dylan for the young Bobby Womack, Womack said he didn't understand it. Cooke explained that from now on, it's not going to be about how pretty the voice is. It's going to be about believing that the voice is telling the truth."


Brilliant quote. And it reminds me a great deal of John Prine's songs. He'd be the first to say his voice was never pretty. Neither in his younger days, nor after his throat cancer turned it gravely (though he will say that the deeper tone he has as a result is more in what his range should have been). His voice isn't pretty, but when you hear him sing his songs, it resonates because even when you know he's just spinning a tale, it's absolutely the "truth".


John Prine was a mailman in Westchester IL just south of where I grew up so he was a local legend at my high school...he went to Proviso East about 10 years before I went to Proviso West so we got a steady diet of his music in class


Indeed he was. He says he came up with a lot of his early material while walking his route. I used to pump gas at a 76 station where he was a regular back in the early ‘80s and he was living in L.A. I liked his Porsche so we’d make small talk while I’d pump his gas. That’s how I came to know his music. My wife is a huge fan of his from her days days growing up outside of Chicago and listening to Prine and Steve Goodman. We make sure to see John perform every chance we can get.



I was just listening Steve Goodman to A Dying Cubs Fan's Last Request...haven't heard it since they won
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7xBxZGQ1dJk&ab_channel=cubbymark

City of New Orleans is one of my favorites since like 71/72 ...junior year
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2018 12:53 am    Post subject: Re: is Bob Dylan legit

PHILosophize wrote:
I mean I know his song is number 1 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the top 500 songs but then again it can't be a coincidence that the song they chose for number 1 has their name in the song so I mean that list can't be trusted, obviously. And don't give me that whole they named their magazine after that song crap because 1) doubtful and 2) that doesn't take away the bias.

I do like that song though I've just never really gotten into Dylan. Is he one of those only-good-because-of-impact-on-later-musicians type of guys (like the Beatles) or are his songs actually legit good?


Are you saying The Beatles' songs aren't legitimately good either?
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2018 4:30 am    Post subject:

Yes, he's legit. He's probably the greatest songwriter of popular music ever.

People often overlook his most recent albums, but Time Out of Mind, Love and Theft, Modern Times and Tempest are amazing works.
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2018 5:46 am    Post subject:

DaMuleRules wrote:
Hector the Pup wrote:
Great lyricist, but there are many songs that I just cant listen to him sing. Others singing them though? Amazing.


Yep. No doubt one of the greatest songwriters of his generation.


Totally this.
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2018 6:22 am    Post subject:

LarryCoon wrote:
Nice quote from RS's "100 Greatest Singers" article: "Bob Dylan did what very, very few singers ever do. He changed popular singing. And we have been living in a world shaped by Dylan's singing ever since. Almost no one sings like Elvis Presley anymore. Hundreds try to sing like Dylan. When Sam Cooke played Dylan for the young Bobby Womack, Womack said he didn't understand it. Cooke explained that from now on, it's not going to be about how pretty the voice is. It's going to be about believing that the voice is telling the truth."


This is much better put than what how I could have put it.

I just can’t imagine some refined voice doing Masters of War or Desolation Row.

And honestly to me, when I hear a cover of a Dylan song, I cringe a bit because it sounds too ‘produced’. Not in all cases but in many. I’ll have to listen to how Sam Cooke portrayed Dylan’s music.

That’s just me and I’m admittedly a big Dylan fan.
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2018 6:45 am    Post subject:

HOF Rookie wrote:
LarryCoon wrote:
Nice quote from RS's "100 Greatest Singers" article: "Bob Dylan did what very, very few singers ever do. He changed popular singing. And we have been living in a world shaped by Dylan's singing ever since. Almost no one sings like Elvis Presley anymore. Hundreds try to sing like Dylan. When Sam Cooke played Dylan for the young Bobby Womack, Womack said he didn't understand it. Cooke explained that from now on, it's not going to be about how pretty the voice is. It's going to be about believing that the voice is telling the truth."


This is much better put than what how I could have put it.

I just can’t imagine some refined voice doing Masters of War or Desolation Row.

And honestly to me, when I hear a cover of a Dylan song, I cringe a bit because it sounds too ‘produced’. Not in all cases but in many. I’ll have to listen to how Sam Cooke portrayed Dylan’s music.

That’s just me and I’m admittedly a big Dylan fan.


With some notable exceptions, I generally don't like covers of Dylan songs. Even some of the more popular ones, like The Byrds' Mr Tambourine Man, sound awful to me by comparison. Even the great Sam Cooke badly misinterpreted Blowin In the Wind.
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2018 7:03 am    Post subject:

LarryCoon wrote:
Nice quote from RS's "100 Greatest Singers" article: "Bob Dylan did what very, very few singers ever do. He changed popular singing. And we have been living in a world shaped by Dylan's singing ever since. Almost no one sings like Elvis Presley anymore. Hundreds try to sing like Dylan. When Sam Cooke played Dylan for the young Bobby Womack, Womack said he didn't understand it. Cooke explained that from now on, it's not going to be about how pretty the voice is. It's going to be about believing that the voice is telling the truth."


But is that actually true? There have been Dylan imitators, and artists whose style was heavily influenced by Dylan, but how many ever attained significant commercial success? For that matter, Dylan's albums sell fairly well, but that's true of a number of niche artists. And that's exactly what he is. I wouldn't call him a fringe artist, exactly, but it has been a long time since he was in the mainstream. Maybe since his Traveling Wilburys phase.

Rolling Stone has worshipped Dylan for decades. That's fine. But when they tell me that Dylan has changed popular singing, it makes me laugh. Sure, Katy Perry, Prince, Michael Jackson, and Lady Gaga are all Dylan clones. Just because a lot of artists admired Dylan does not mean that much. They same artists admired -- and often covered -- the Beatles, Chuck Berry, Elvis Presley, and others. Musicians are just like that.
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2018 7:15 am    Post subject:

ocho wrote:
HOF Rookie wrote:
LarryCoon wrote:
Nice quote from RS's "100 Greatest Singers" article: "Bob Dylan did what very, very few singers ever do. He changed popular singing. And we have been living in a world shaped by Dylan's singing ever since. Almost no one sings like Elvis Presley anymore. Hundreds try to sing like Dylan. When Sam Cooke played Dylan for the young Bobby Womack, Womack said he didn't understand it. Cooke explained that from now on, it's not going to be about how pretty the voice is. It's going to be about believing that the voice is telling the truth."


This is much better put than what how I could have put it.

I just can’t imagine some refined voice doing Masters of War or Desolation Row.

And honestly to me, when I hear a cover of a Dylan song, I cringe a bit because it sounds too ‘produced’. Not in all cases but in many. I’ll have to listen to how Sam Cooke portrayed Dylan’s music.

That’s just me and I’m admittedly a big Dylan fan.


With some notable exceptions, I generally don't like covers of Dylan songs. Even some of the more popular ones, like The Byrds' Mr Tambourine Man, sound awful to me by comparison. Even the great Sam Cooke badly misinterpreted Blowin In the Wind.


Try a few of these Spanish 8, what do you think? You can tell I bias towards live music rather than studio stuff, lol.

Jimi Hendrix - Like A Rolling Stone

https://vimeo.com/260364879

Grateful Dead - It's All Over Now Baby Blue

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WvCK5Cgxc3Y

Warren Haynes - I Shall Be Released

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x3vs1UDZCzo
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2018 7:19 am    Post subject:

Aeneas Hunter wrote:
LarryCoon wrote:
Nice quote from RS's "100 Greatest Singers" article: "Bob Dylan did what very, very few singers ever do. He changed popular singing. And we have been living in a world shaped by Dylan's singing ever since. Almost no one sings like Elvis Presley anymore. Hundreds try to sing like Dylan. When Sam Cooke played Dylan for the young Bobby Womack, Womack said he didn't understand it. Cooke explained that from now on, it's not going to be about how pretty the voice is. It's going to be about believing that the voice is telling the truth."


But is that actually true? There have been Dylan imitators, and artists whose style was heavily influenced by Dylan, but how many ever attained significant commercial success? For that matter, Dylan's albums sell fairly well, but that's true of a number of niche artists. And that's exactly what he is. I wouldn't call him a fringe artist, exactly, but it has been a long time since he was in the mainstream. Maybe since his Traveling Wilburys phase.

Rolling Stone has worshipped Dylan for decades. That's fine. But when they tell me that Dylan has changed popular singing, it makes me laugh. Sure, Katy Perry, Prince, Michael Jackson, and Lady Gaga are all Dylan clones. Just because a lot of artists admired Dylan does not mean that much. They same artists admired -- and often covered -- the Beatles, Chuck Berry, Elvis Presley, and others. Musicians are just like that.


I must agree; that quote is truly outragious. Rolling Stone would be better served if they simply said Dylan changed (though influenced would be the better word) popular music (he no doubt influenced Rubber Soul, Donovan, the Byrds, and others), but even this would be temporary.

I think it is appropriate to add that Dylan was not this great civil rights or anti war leader. He wrote songs that greatly influenced these movements, but he had little interest in leading either movement.

One last aside, listen to this to see the musical influence (as was often the case) for one of his most famous songs: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SfbpsmbxE2c
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Last edited by ribeye on Tue Nov 27, 2018 7:37 am; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2018 7:37 am    Post subject:

1. Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues
2. When The Ships Come In
3. Time They Are A'Changin
4. Let Me Die in my Footsteps

These are all in my top 100 favorite songs of all time.
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2018 7:40 am    Post subject:

One more note here: If you have not seen it, go watch Martin Scorsese's documentary, No Direction Home. It is an excellent portrait of the young Bob Dylan (with impressive historical footage) that does a great job of putting Dylan into historical context. When I saw it, I was struck by the thought that there is a symmetry between Dylan and some of the early hip-hop greats, even though there is not any superficial similarity in the music style. I wonder whether anyone else reacted that way.
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2018 7:48 am    Post subject:

Aeneas Hunter wrote:
One more note here: If you have not seen it, go watch Martin Scorsese's documentary, No Direction Home. It is an excellent portrait of the young Bob Dylan (with impressive historical footage) that does a great job of putting Dylan into historical context. When I saw it, I was struck by the thought that there is a symmetry between Dylan and some of the early hip-hop greats, even though there is not any superficial similarity in the music style. I wonder whether anyone else reacted that way.


Before the Story of Addidon and Hit Em Up there was Like a Rolling Stone and Idiot Wind. I'm not sure who gets credit for inventing the diss track but I think it might have been Dylan.
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2018 7:57 am    Post subject:

LakerLanny wrote:
ocho wrote:
HOF Rookie wrote:
LarryCoon wrote:
Nice quote from RS's "100 Greatest Singers" article: "Bob Dylan did what very, very few singers ever do. He changed popular singing. And we have been living in a world shaped by Dylan's singing ever since. Almost no one sings like Elvis Presley anymore. Hundreds try to sing like Dylan. When Sam Cooke played Dylan for the young Bobby Womack, Womack said he didn't understand it. Cooke explained that from now on, it's not going to be about how pretty the voice is. It's going to be about believing that the voice is telling the truth."


This is much better put than what how I could have put it.

I just can’t imagine some refined voice doing Masters of War or Desolation Row.

And honestly to me, when I hear a cover of a Dylan song, I cringe a bit because it sounds too ‘produced’. Not in all cases but in many. I’ll have to listen to how Sam Cooke portrayed Dylan’s music.

That’s just me and I’m admittedly a big Dylan fan.


With some notable exceptions, I generally don't like covers of Dylan songs. Even some of the more popular ones, like The Byrds' Mr Tambourine Man, sound awful to me by comparison. Even the great Sam Cooke badly misinterpreted Blowin In the Wind.


Try a few of these Spanish 8, what do you think? You can tell I bias towards live music rather than studio stuff, lol.

Jimi Hendrix - Like A Rolling Stone

https://vimeo.com/260364879

Grateful Dead - It's All Over Now Baby Blue

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WvCK5Cgxc3Y

Warren Haynes - I Shall Be Released

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x3vs1UDZCzo


In all 3 cases I prefer the originals. Like a Rolling Stone is one of those songs that gets covered a lot but nobody sounds as good as Bob singing it imo. I Shall Be Released probably has the best covers of all of his songs. I love the Last Waltz version (which isn't technically a cover because The Band was his band and he's on stage here but still)

https://youtu.be/MjtPBjEz-BA

I also prefer The Band doing When I Paint My Masterpiece to when Dylan does it:

https://youtu.be/efLy6wH4fWk

tl;dr The Band is awesome.
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2018 8:18 am    Post subject:

VicXLakers wrote:

I was just listening Steve Goodman to A Dying Cubs Fan's Last Request...haven't heard it since they won
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7xBxZGQ1dJk&ab_channel=cubbymark

City of New Orleans is one of my favorites since like 71/72 ...junior year


Nice!
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2018 8:19 am    Post subject:

LakerLanny wrote:

Warren Haynes - I Shall Be Released

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x3vs1UDZCzo


:thumbs:

Love Warren (obviously )
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2018 10:20 am    Post subject:

DaMuleRules wrote:
VicXLakers wrote:

I was just listening Steve Goodman to A Dying Cubs Fan's Last Request...haven't heard it since they won
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7xBxZGQ1dJk&ab_channel=cubbymark

City of New Orleans is one of my favorites since like 71/72 ...junior year


Nice!


Great new interview with John just popped up in my recommended videos...
John Prine, the "Singing Mailman," delivers again
Published on Nov 25, 2018
Quote:
John Prine started writing songs while delivering mail in Chicago in the late 1960s. Over the last 50 years, classic tunes just seemed to pour out of him – some sad, like "Angel From Montgomery" and "Sam Stone"; some funny, like "Illegal Smile" and "In Spite of Ourselves." Now, after beating cancer twice, the 72-year-old Prine is back with a new album, "The Tree of Forgiveness," and it's turning into the biggest record of his career, debuting at #2 on the Billboard Rock and Country charts. Anthony Mason pays a visit to Prine (whom Rolling Stone calls the "Mark Twain of American Songwriting") at his home in Nashville.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ORVo6whri4&ab_channel=CBSSundayMorning
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2018 10:29 am    Post subject:

ribeye wrote:
Aeneas Hunter wrote:
LarryCoon wrote:
Nice quote from RS's "100 Greatest Singers" article: "Bob Dylan did what very, very few singers ever do. He changed popular singing. And we have been living in a world shaped by Dylan's singing ever since. Almost no one sings like Elvis Presley anymore. Hundreds try to sing like Dylan. When Sam Cooke played Dylan for the young Bobby Womack, Womack said he didn't understand it. Cooke explained that from now on, it's not going to be about how pretty the voice is. It's going to be about believing that the voice is telling the truth."


But is that actually true? There have been Dylan imitators, and artists whose style was heavily influenced by Dylan, but how many ever attained significant commercial success? For that matter, Dylan's albums sell fairly well, but that's true of a number of niche artists. And that's exactly what he is. I wouldn't call him a fringe artist, exactly, but it has been a long time since he was in the mainstream. Maybe since his Traveling Wilburys phase.

Rolling Stone has worshipped Dylan for decades. That's fine. But when they tell me that Dylan has changed popular singing, it makes me laugh. Sure, Katy Perry, Prince, Michael Jackson, and Lady Gaga are all Dylan clones. Just because a lot of artists admired Dylan does not mean that much. They same artists admired -- and often covered -- the Beatles, Chuck Berry, Elvis Presley, and others. Musicians are just like that.


I must agree; that quote is truly outragious. Rolling Stone would be better served if they simply said Dylan changed (though influenced would be the better word) popular music (he no doubt influenced Rubber Soul, Donovan, the Byrds, and others), but even this would be temporary.

I think it is appropriate to add that Dylan was not this great civil rights or anti war leader. He wrote songs that greatly influenced these movements, but he had little interest in leading either movement.

One last aside, listen to this to see the musical influence (as was often the case) for one of his most famous songs: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SfbpsmbxE2c


Donovan is an often overlooked songwriter but one of my favorites of his is a cover of a very overlooked Buffy Sainte-Marie song...
DONOVAN - The Universal Soldier
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UC9pc4U40sI&ab_channel=BeatnikManfred

words that can't be denied...
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2018 10:32 am    Post subject:

VicXLakers wrote:
ribeye wrote:
Aeneas Hunter wrote:
LarryCoon wrote:
Nice quote from RS's "100 Greatest Singers" article: "Bob Dylan did what very, very few singers ever do. He changed popular singing. And we have been living in a world shaped by Dylan's singing ever since. Almost no one sings like Elvis Presley anymore. Hundreds try to sing like Dylan. When Sam Cooke played Dylan for the young Bobby Womack, Womack said he didn't understand it. Cooke explained that from now on, it's not going to be about how pretty the voice is. It's going to be about believing that the voice is telling the truth."


But is that actually true? There have been Dylan imitators, and artists whose style was heavily influenced by Dylan, but how many ever attained significant commercial success? For that matter, Dylan's albums sell fairly well, but that's true of a number of niche artists. And that's exactly what he is. I wouldn't call him a fringe artist, exactly, but it has been a long time since he was in the mainstream. Maybe since his Traveling Wilburys phase.

Rolling Stone has worshipped Dylan for decades. That's fine. But when they tell me that Dylan has changed popular singing, it makes me laugh. Sure, Katy Perry, Prince, Michael Jackson, and Lady Gaga are all Dylan clones. Just because a lot of artists admired Dylan does not mean that much. They same artists admired -- and often covered -- the Beatles, Chuck Berry, Elvis Presley, and others. Musicians are just like that.


I must agree; that quote is truly outragious. Rolling Stone would be better served if they simply said Dylan changed (though influenced would be the better word) popular music (he no doubt influenced Rubber Soul, Donovan, the Byrds, and others), but even this would be temporary.

I think it is appropriate to add that Dylan was not this great civil rights or anti war leader. He wrote songs that greatly influenced these movements, but he had little interest in leading either movement.

One last aside, listen to this to see the musical influence (as was often the case) for one of his most famous songs: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SfbpsmbxE2c


Donovan is an often overlooked songwriter but one of my favorites of his is a cover of a very overlooked Buffy Sainte-Marie song...
DONOVAN - The Universal Soldier
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UC9pc4U40sI&ab_channel=BeatnikManfred

words that can't be denied...


Yes, great song. His Sunshine Superman is an all-time classic album.
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2018 11:05 am    Post subject:

Aeneas Hunter wrote:
One more note here: If you have not seen it, go watch Martin Scorsese's documentary, No Direction Home. It is an excellent portrait of the young Bob Dylan (with impressive historical footage) that does a great job of putting Dylan into historical context. When I saw it, I was struck by the thought that there is a symmetry between Dylan and some of the early hip-hop greats, even though there is not any superficial similarity in the music style. I wonder whether anyone else reacted that way.


a good scene with Bob and Donovan...Donovan does To Sing for You and Bob retorts with It's All Over...


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lc6HcA6kEJc&ab_channel=jiggawhat86

another scene....Love minus zero

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9w1mCevu3sU&ab_channel=DavidG.Armstrong
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2018 11:17 am    Post subject:

VicXLakers wrote:
DaMuleRules wrote:
VicXLakers wrote:

I was just listening Steve Goodman to A Dying Cubs Fan's Last Request...haven't heard it since they won
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7xBxZGQ1dJk&ab_channel=cubbymark

City of New Orleans is one of my favorites since like 71/72 ...junior year


Nice!


Great new interview with John just popped up in my recommended videos...
John Prine, the "Singing Mailman," delivers again
Published on Nov 25, 2018
Quote:
John Prine started writing songs while delivering mail in Chicago in the late 1960s. Over the last 50 years, classic tunes just seemed to pour out of him – some sad, like "Angel From Montgomery" and "Sam Stone"; some funny, like "Illegal Smile" and "In Spite of Ourselves." Now, after beating cancer twice, the 72-year-old Prine is back with a new album, "The Tree of Forgiveness," and it's turning into the biggest record of his career, debuting at #2 on the Billboard Rock and Country charts. Anthony Mason pays a visit to Prine (whom Rolling Stone calls the "Mark Twain of American Songwriting") at his home in Nashville.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ORVo6whri4&ab_channel=CBSSundayMorning


Thanks! His interview with Marc Maron on WTF is worth a listen as well.
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2018 3:01 pm    Post subject:

He had this streak of classic albums between 65 and 66 with Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61 Revisited and Blonde on Blonde. For me his catalog after that was somewhat uneven in quality, with gems in between like Modern Times.
As for him being legit, he's one of the greatest American songwriters ever, and arguably the most influential. SO yeah, he's more than legit.
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2018 4:15 pm    Post subject:

Buck32 wrote:
He had this streak of classic albums between 65 and 66 with Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61 Revisited and Blonde on Blonde. For me his catalog after that was somewhat uneven in quality, with gems in between like Modern Times.
As for him being legit, he's one of the greatest American songwriters ever, and arguably the most influential. SO yeah, he's more than legit.


Bob is adventurous if nothing else. He changed his sounds a few times. Went from folk to Electric with the Butterfield Blues band backing him at Newport and his fans hated it. Then he had a good run with the Band who were great in their own right. But one of my favorite periods we're the album's with the Rolling Thunder Review was Blood on the Tracks. Great album great sound. Street Legal was pretty awesome as well IMO.
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2018 4:42 pm    Post subject:

ExPatLkrFan wrote:
Buck32 wrote:
He had this streak of classic albums between 65 and 66 with Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61 Revisited and Blonde on Blonde. For me his catalog after that was somewhat uneven in quality, with gems in between like Modern Times.
As for him being legit, he's one of the greatest American songwriters ever, and arguably the most influential. SO yeah, he's more than legit.


Bob is adventurous if nothing else. He changed his sounds a few times. Went from folk to Electric with the Butterfield Blues band backing him at Newport and his fans hated it. Then he had a good run with the Band who were great in their own right. But one of my favorite periods we're the album's with the Rolling Thunder Review was Blood on the Tracks. Great album great sound. Street Legal was pretty awesome as well IMO.


It's been at least a decade since I've heard reference to Paul Butterfield

big fan of Chicago blues having grown up just outside Chicago and a longtime fan of Paul's having lived just south of Butterfield rd.
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2018 4:50 pm    Post subject:

Aeneas Hunter wrote:
LarryCoon wrote:
Nice quote from RS's "100 Greatest Singers" article: "Bob Dylan did what very, very few singers ever do. He changed popular singing. And we have been living in a world shaped by Dylan's singing ever since. Almost no one sings like Elvis Presley anymore. Hundreds try to sing like Dylan. When Sam Cooke played Dylan for the young Bobby Womack, Womack said he didn't understand it. Cooke explained that from now on, it's not going to be about how pretty the voice is. It's going to be about believing that the voice is telling the truth."


But is that actually true? There have been Dylan imitators, and artists whose style was heavily influenced by Dylan, but how many ever attained significant commercial success? For that matter, Dylan's albums sell fairly well, but that's true of a number of niche artists. And that's exactly what he is. I wouldn't call him a fringe artist, exactly, but it has been a long time since he was in the mainstream. Maybe since his Traveling Wilburys phase.

Rolling Stone has worshipped Dylan for decades. That's fine. But when they tell me that Dylan has changed popular singing, it makes me laugh. Sure, Katy Perry, Prince, Michael Jackson, and Lady Gaga are all Dylan clones. Just because a lot of artists admired Dylan does not mean that much. They same artists admired -- and often covered -- the Beatles, Chuck Berry, Elvis Presley, and others. Musicians are just like that.


I might be going off topic a bit but I like this thread of the conversation.

I have a friend that I argue with quite a bit and he insists that Frank Sinatra is the greatest American vocalist of all time. I admit he was incredibly talented but I don't see him as the best of all time. In many ways, he was a one-trick pony in that he was a wonderful crooner but never did anything meaningful or impressive outside of his genre.

I argue (somewhat for sport) that Marvin Gaye was a much better singer. Not only did he successfully go through a Nat King Cole imitation phase, but his soul singing was as good as anyone across all genres. I don't know that I'm fully committed to this argument other than to say that Sinatra wasn't the best ever across all genres. Marvin Gaye is better than anyone else I can think of, but I'm open to suggestions.
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