is Bob Dylan legit
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PHILosophize
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2018 4:51 pm    Post subject:

i love bob dylan
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2018 5:46 pm    Post subject:

VicXLakers wrote:
ExPatLkrFan wrote:
Buck32 wrote:
He had this streak of classic albums between 65 and 66 with Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61 Revisited and Blonde on Blonde. For me his catalog after that was somewhat uneven in quality, with gems in between like Modern Times.
As for him being legit, he's one of the greatest American songwriters ever, and arguably the most influential. SO yeah, he's more than legit.


Bob is adventurous if nothing else. He changed his sounds a few times. Went from folk to Electric with the Butterfield Blues band backing him at Newport and his fans hated it. Then he had a good run with the Band who were great in their own right. But one of my favorite periods we're the album's with the Rolling Thunder Review was Blood on the Tracks. Great album great sound. Street Legal was pretty awesome as well IMO.


It's been at least a decade since I've heard reference to Paul Butterfield

big fan of Chicago blues having grown up just outside Chicago and a longtime fan of Paul's having lived just south of Butterfield rd.


I was able to see some great blues harp players in the day. He was one of the best caught his act with his Better Days band at the old Golden Bear in HB. It was a great show
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2018 6:29 pm    Post subject:

ExPatLkrFan wrote:
VicXLakers wrote:
ExPatLkrFan wrote:
Buck32 wrote:
He had this streak of classic albums between 65 and 66 with Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61 Revisited and Blonde on Blonde. For me his catalog after that was somewhat uneven in quality, with gems in between like Modern Times.
As for him being legit, he's one of the greatest American songwriters ever, and arguably the most influential. SO yeah, he's more than legit.


Bob is adventurous if nothing else. He changed his sounds a few times. Went from folk to Electric with the Butterfield Blues band backing him at Newport and his fans hated it. Then he had a good run with the Band who were great in their own right. But one of my favorite periods we're the album's with the Rolling Thunder Review was Blood on the Tracks. Great album great sound. Street Legal was pretty awesome as well IMO.


It's been at least a decade since I've heard reference to Paul Butterfield

big fan of Chicago blues having grown up just outside Chicago and a longtime fan of Paul's having lived just south of Butterfield rd.


I was able to see some great blues harp players in the day. He was one of the best caught his act with his Better Days band at the old Golden Bear in HB. It was a great show


I saw him at the Kinetic Playground in Chicago in 73...fantastic!
I wore out my brothers album...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dwMqBvBLJio&ab_channel=JIMBLUESROCKCHANNEL

Love his harp playing...it's what I liked most about early Zeppelin's blues cuts
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2018 2:39 am    Post subject:

Ahh the days of wearing out an LP.....
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Buck32
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2018 5:09 am    Post subject:

VicXLakers wrote:
ExPatLkrFan wrote:
Buck32 wrote:
He had this streak of classic albums between 65 and 66 with Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61 Revisited and Blonde on Blonde. For me his catalog after that was somewhat uneven in quality, with gems in between like Modern Times.
As for him being legit, he's one of the greatest American songwriters ever, and arguably the most influential. SO yeah, he's more than legit.


Bob is adventurous if nothing else. He changed his sounds a few times. Went from folk to Electric with the Butterfield Blues band backing him at Newport and his fans hated it. Then he had a good run with the Band who were great in their own right. But one of my favorite periods we're the album's with the Rolling Thunder Review was Blood on the Tracks. Great album great sound. Street Legal was pretty awesome as well IMO.


It's been at least a decade since I've heard reference to Paul Butterfield

big fan of Chicago blues having grown up just outside Chicago and a longtime fan of Paul's having lived just south of Butterfield rd.


Mike Bloomfiled was also an extremely underrated guitarist. His guitar playing for Dylan's Maggie's Farm at Newport was just amazing and partly defined Dylan's music going forward.
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2018 7:30 am    Post subject:

ocho wrote:


In all 3 cases I prefer the originals. Like a Rolling Stone is one of those songs that gets covered a lot but nobody sounds as good as Bob singing it imo. I Shall Be Released probably has the best covers of all of his songs. I love the Last Waltz version (which isn't technically a cover because The Band was his band and he's on stage here but still)

https://youtu.be/MjtPBjEz-BA

I also prefer The Band doing When I Paint My Masterpiece to when Dylan does it:

https://youtu.be/efLy6wH4fWk

tl;dr The Band is awesome.


Love The Band, they were fantastic.

Perhaps an unfair advantage since as you said technically they were Dylan's backing band for a while.

Music From Big Pink was an all time great album. It is unfortunate that they ended up in money squabbles and such, they were such a tight group.
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Aeneas Hunter
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2018 7:55 am    Post subject:

I’m not much of a Dylan fan. I respect him, but his niche isn’t my cup of tea. The Band, on the other hand, is one of my favorites. Big Pink, The Band, and Stagefright was a great run of albums. The later stuff was hit and miss, but some of it was pretty good.
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2018 7:07 pm    Post subject:

[millennial]Like legit, legit?[/millennial]
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2018 11:04 pm    Post subject:

I've never really listened to his music, but I just listened to Like a Rolling Stone and it's pretty amazing
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 30, 2018 2:02 am    Post subject:

Buck32 wrote:
VicXLakers wrote:
ExPatLkrFan wrote:
Buck32 wrote:
He had this streak of classic albums between 65 and 66 with Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61 Revisited and Blonde on Blonde. For me his catalog after that was somewhat uneven in quality, with gems in between like Modern Times.
As for him being legit, he's one of the greatest American songwriters ever, and arguably the most influential. SO yeah, he's more than legit.


Bob is adventurous if nothing else. He changed his sounds a few times. Went from folk to Electric with the Butterfield Blues band backing him at Newport and his fans hated it. Then he had a good run with the Band who were great in their own right. But one of my favorite periods we're the album's with the Rolling Thunder Review was Blood on the Tracks. Great album great sound. Street Legal was pretty awesome as well IMO.


It's been at least a decade since I've heard reference to Paul Butterfield

big fan of Chicago blues having grown up just outside Chicago and a longtime fan of Paul's having lived just south of Butterfield rd.


Mike Bloomfiled was also an extremely underrated guitarist. His guitar playing for Dylan's Maggie's Farm at Newport was just amazing and partly defined Dylan's music going forward.


very underrated guitarist...maybe the most overlooked
AND another Chicago product AND another great musician from Chicago gone in the 80's with Butterfield and Goodman

from wiki...
In June 1965 Bloomfield had recorded with Bob Dylan, whom he had met in 1963 at a Chicago club called the Bear. The club was bankrolled by future Dylan and Butterfield manager Albert Grossman, who would play a major part in Bloomfield's career. Bloomfield's Telecaster guitar licks were featured on Dylan's "Like a Rolling Stone", a single produced by Columbia Record's Tom Wilson. Bloomfield would play on most of the tracks on Dylan's 1965 Highway 61 Revisited album, and he appeared onstage with Dylan in July at the Newport Folk Festival, where Dylan used Bloomfield and the Butterfield Band—minus Paul Butterfield—along with keyboardists Al Kooper and Barry Goldberg. The show marked Dylan's first use of an electric band in a live performance, and Bloomfield's playing on the songwriter's "Maggie's Farm" is considered a landmark electric-guitar performance.

Maggie's Farm

from a doc I have not seen...
The Other Side of the Mirror: Bob Dylan at the Newport Folk Festival (1963-1965)
https://ok.ru/video/212689488405

slow download available here
https://m.ok.ru/video/212689488405
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 01, 2018 2:04 pm    Post subject:

Wow, just found this thread.

Big Dylan fan here, my favorite artist of all time. Love his music, he has tons of great albums (and a lot of bad ones too) and there's such a different vibe to most of them, it's really astonishing. he kinda changed music in the early and mid 60s.... but his best record imho is DESIRE from 1978.
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2018 5:14 am    Post subject:

VicXLakers wrote:
Buck32 wrote:
VicXLakers wrote:
ExPatLkrFan wrote:
Buck32 wrote:
He had this streak of classic albums between 65 and 66 with Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61 Revisited and Blonde on Blonde. For me his catalog after that was somewhat uneven in quality, with gems in between like Modern Times.
As for him being legit, he's one of the greatest American songwriters ever, and arguably the most influential. SO yeah, he's more than legit.


Bob is adventurous if nothing else. He changed his sounds a few times. Went from folk to Electric with the Butterfield Blues band backing him at Newport and his fans hated it. Then he had a good run with the Band who were great in their own right. But one of my favorite periods we're the album's with the Rolling Thunder Review was Blood on the Tracks. Great album great sound. Street Legal was pretty awesome as well IMO.


It's been at least a decade since I've heard reference to Paul Butterfield

big fan of Chicago blues having grown up just outside Chicago and a longtime fan of Paul's having lived just south of Butterfield rd.


Mike Bloomfiled was also an extremely underrated guitarist. His guitar playing for Dylan's Maggie's Farm at Newport was just amazing and partly defined Dylan's music going forward.


very underrated guitarist...maybe the most overlooked
AND another Chicago product AND another great musician from Chicago gone in the 80's with Butterfield and Goodman

from wiki...
In June 1965 Bloomfield had recorded with Bob Dylan, whom he had met in 1963 at a Chicago club called the Bear. The club was bankrolled by future Dylan and Butterfield manager Albert Grossman, who would play a major part in Bloomfield's career. Bloomfield's Telecaster guitar licks were featured on Dylan's "Like a Rolling Stone", a single produced by Columbia Record's Tom Wilson. Bloomfield would play on most of the tracks on Dylan's 1965 Highway 61 Revisited album, and he appeared onstage with Dylan in July at the Newport Folk Festival, where Dylan used Bloomfield and the Butterfield Band—minus Paul Butterfield—along with keyboardists Al Kooper and Barry Goldberg. The show marked Dylan's first use of an electric band in a live performance, and Bloomfield's playing on the songwriter's "Maggie's Farm" is considered a landmark electric-guitar performance.

Maggie's Farm

from a doc I have not seen...
The Other Side of the Mirror: Bob Dylan at the Newport Folk Festival (1963-1965)
https://ok.ru/video/212689488405

slow download available here
https://m.ok.ru/video/212689488405


For those of you that appreciate Mike Bloomfield, the album Electric Flag - Long Time Comin' is a must. Nick Gravenites, Mike Bloomfield, Buddy Miles and horn players galore. it's truly a 1968 musical feast if you're into blues soul and rock fusion. I got it on my desert island list for sure.
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2018 6:12 am    Post subject:

Missed this thread.

The answer is yes.
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2018 7:18 am    Post subject:

ExPatLkrFan wrote:
VicXLakers wrote:
Buck32 wrote:
VicXLakers wrote:
ExPatLkrFan wrote:
Buck32 wrote:
He had this streak of classic albums between 65 and 66 with Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61 Revisited and Blonde on Blonde. For me his catalog after that was somewhat uneven in quality, with gems in between like Modern Times.
As for him being legit, he's one of the greatest American songwriters ever, and arguably the most influential. SO yeah, he's more than legit.


Bob is adventurous if nothing else. He changed his sounds a few times. Went from folk to Electric with the Butterfield Blues band backing him at Newport and his fans hated it. Then he had a good run with the Band who were great in their own right. But one of my favorite periods we're the album's with the Rolling Thunder Review was Blood on the Tracks. Great album great sound. Street Legal was pretty awesome as well IMO.


It's been at least a decade since I've heard reference to Paul Butterfield

big fan of Chicago blues having grown up just outside Chicago and a longtime fan of Paul's having lived just south of Butterfield rd.


Mike Bloomfiled was also an extremely underrated guitarist. His guitar playing for Dylan's Maggie's Farm at Newport was just amazing and partly defined Dylan's music going forward.


very underrated guitarist...maybe the most overlooked
AND another Chicago product AND another great musician from Chicago gone in the 80's with Butterfield and Goodman

from wiki...
In June 1965 Bloomfield had recorded with Bob Dylan, whom he had met in 1963 at a Chicago club called the Bear. The club was bankrolled by future Dylan and Butterfield manager Albert Grossman, who would play a major part in Bloomfield's career. Bloomfield's Telecaster guitar licks were featured on Dylan's "Like a Rolling Stone", a single produced by Columbia Record's Tom Wilson. Bloomfield would play on most of the tracks on Dylan's 1965 Highway 61 Revisited album, and he appeared onstage with Dylan in July at the Newport Folk Festival, where Dylan used Bloomfield and the Butterfield Band—minus Paul Butterfield—along with keyboardists Al Kooper and Barry Goldberg. The show marked Dylan's first use of an electric band in a live performance, and Bloomfield's playing on the songwriter's "Maggie's Farm" is considered a landmark electric-guitar performance.

Maggie's Farm

from a doc I have not seen...
The Other Side of the Mirror: Bob Dylan at the Newport Folk Festival (1963-1965)
https://ok.ru/video/212689488405

slow download available here
https://m.ok.ru/video/212689488405


For those of you that appreciate Mike Bloomfield, the album Electric Flag - Long Time Comin' is a must. Nick Gravenites, Mike Bloomfield, Buddy Miles and horn players galore. it's truly a 1968 musical feast if you're into blues soul and rock fusion. I got it on my desert island list for sure.




I'll have to check it out...thanks

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ur1KP9GvYJ8&ab_channel=FrankCappapsych-marine

I did dl an mp3 copy of the soundtrack from The Trip
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2018 9:56 am    Post subject:

PHILosophize wrote:
i love bob dylan

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 05, 2018 7:58 am    Post subject:

Hector the Pup wrote:
Great lyricist, but there are many songs that I just cant listen to him sing. Others singing them though? Amazing.

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 12:55 am    Post subject:

ExPatLkrFan wrote:
VicXLakers wrote:
Buck32 wrote:
VicXLakers wrote:
ExPatLkrFan wrote:
Buck32 wrote:
He had this streak of classic albums between 65 and 66 with Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61 Revisited and Blonde on Blonde. For me his catalog after that was somewhat uneven in quality, with gems in between like Modern Times.
As for him being legit, he's one of the greatest American songwriters ever, and arguably the most influential. SO yeah, he's more than legit.


Bob is adventurous if nothing else. He changed his sounds a few times. Went from folk to Electric with the Butterfield Blues band backing him at Newport and his fans hated it. Then he had a good run with the Band who were great in their own right. But one of my favorite periods we're the album's with the Rolling Thunder Review was Blood on the Tracks. Great album great sound. Street Legal was pretty awesome as well IMO.


It's been at least a decade since I've heard reference to Paul Butterfield

big fan of Chicago blues having grown up just outside Chicago and a longtime fan of Paul's having lived just south of Butterfield rd.


Mike Bloomfiled was also an extremely underrated guitarist. His guitar playing for Dylan's Maggie's Farm at Newport was just amazing and partly defined Dylan's music going forward.


very underrated guitarist...maybe the most overlooked
AND another Chicago product AND another great musician from Chicago gone in the 80's with Butterfield and Goodman

from wiki...
In June 1965 Bloomfield had recorded with Bob Dylan, whom he had met in 1963 at a Chicago club called the Bear. The club was bankrolled by future Dylan and Butterfield manager Albert Grossman, who would play a major part in Bloomfield's career. Bloomfield's Telecaster guitar licks were featured on Dylan's "Like a Rolling Stone", a single produced by Columbia Record's Tom Wilson. Bloomfield would play on most of the tracks on Dylan's 1965 Highway 61 Revisited album, and he appeared onstage with Dylan in July at the Newport Folk Festival, where Dylan used Bloomfield and the Butterfield Band—minus Paul Butterfield—along with keyboardists Al Kooper and Barry Goldberg. The show marked Dylan's first use of an electric band in a live performance, and Bloomfield's playing on the songwriter's "Maggie's Farm" is considered a landmark electric-guitar performance.

Maggie's Farm

from a doc I have not seen...
The Other Side of the Mirror: Bob Dylan at the Newport Folk Festival (1963-1965)
https://ok.ru/video/212689488405

slow download available here
https://m.ok.ru/video/212689488405


For those of you that appreciate Mike Bloomfield, the album Electric Flag - Long Time Comin' is a must. Nick Gravenites, Mike Bloomfield, Buddy Miles and horn players galore. it's truly a 1968 musical feast if you're into blues soul and rock fusion. I got it on my desert island list for sure.


Thanks man, sounds like a precursor to Blood, Sweat & Tears and early Chicago with all those horns.
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 1:34 am    Post subject:

VicXLakers wrote:
ExPatLkrFan wrote:


For those of you that appreciate Mike Bloomfield, the album Electric Flag - Long Time Comin' is a must. Nick Gravenites, Mike Bloomfield, Buddy Miles and horn players galore. it's truly a 1968 musical feast if you're into blues soul and rock fusion. I got it on my desert island list for sure.




I'll have to check it out...thanks

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ur1KP9GvYJ8&ab_channel=FrankCappapsych-marine



dl for that album and many others is linked on that youtube page...

The Electric Flag - A Long Time Comin'

http://wasntborntofollow10.blogspot.com/

I see Dylan, Dead, The Band,Spencer Davis/Trafic,Yardbirds and about 200 more
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 2:34 pm    Post subject:

Take A Moment To Enjoy Earl Scruggs & The Byrds On The Farm

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CWqGw4hZ-7g&ab_channel=DavidHoffman

In this clip, Roger McGuinn and his fellow Byrds sing one of their classics, Bob Dylan's You Ain't Going Nowhere with Earl Scruggs, the great banjo picker accompanied by his 16-year-old son guitarist, Randy Scruggs.
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 8:58 pm    Post subject:

Dylan revolutionized rock by, among other things, bridging the gap between folk music and rock n roll.

The notion that Dylan 'can't sing' is so ironic considering that he was also a revolutionary when it came to performance. When he was signed back in the early 60's, late 50's, he looked "weird", sounded "weird", his songs didn't fit the top 40 radio format. But to the credit of John Hammond, instead of seeing Dylan as just a songwriter (because of his peculiarities), allowed Dylan to sing his own songs on records which in turn meant Dylan could perform those songs in concert. His deadpan nasally monotone actually enhanced the import of his songs because the voice never got in the way of his lyrics.

Dylan was key in the emergence of the singer songwriter in rock. His presentation was as low key as it got. People knew that the strength of his music were his lyrics, so audiences actually listened. They listened despite his weird voice and look. He proved you didn't have to look like Elvis or have the dynamism of Chuck Berry in order to move an audience.

But his most important contribution were, of course, his songs which represented some of the first in rock to address social and political issues. Just look at some of the bands he has directly influenced like the Byrds, Beatles, The Eagles, Springsteen, Tom Petty, who have in turn passed Dylan on to the nest generations, in order to get an idea of his legacy.

Dylan's monumental importance to rock music cannot be over stated.
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 06, 2018 9:14 pm    Post subject: Re: is Bob Dylan legit

PHILosophize wrote:
I mean I know his song is number 1 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the top 500 songs but then again it can't be a coincidence that the song they chose for number 1 has their name in the song so I mean that list can't be trusted, obviously. And don't give me that whole they named their magazine after that song crap because 1) doubtful and 2) that doesn't take away the bias.

No offense, but the notion that RS Magazine would choose the no. 1 song in their list of top 500 songs of all time because the song has the magazine's name in it's title, is ridiculous. It gains the magazine nothing whatsoever to choose a song with it's name in it.
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